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RG-72.24.02, Postcard sent from Corporal Jona Richfield from Stalag VIII to Margit Richfield in Tel Aviv, Palestine, 11 February 1942 | Los Angeles Museum of the Holocaust

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RG-72.24.02, Postcard sent from Corporal Jona Richfield from Stalag VIII to Margit Richfield in Tel Aviv, Palestine, 11 February 1942.pdf (PDF Document, 418.53 KB)
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Title:
RG-72.24.02, Postcard sent from Corporal Jona Richfield from Stalag VIII to Margit Richfield in Tel Aviv, Palestine, 11 February 1942
Date:
11 February, 1942
ID:
RG-72.24.02
Repository:
Los Angeles Museum of the Holocaust
Found in:
Ed Victor Papers, 1933-1972Add to your cart. right-pointing arrow Sub-Collection 24: RG-72.24, Correspondence from and to prisoner of war camps, 1939 -- 1945 right-pointing arrow Document/Artifact of Item-Level 02: RG-72.24.02, Postcard sent from Corporal Jona Richfield from Stalag VIII B in Silesia (Germany)  to Margit Richfield in Tel Aviv, Palestine, 11 February 1942 Stalag VIII-B Lamsdorf was a notorious German Army prisoner of war camp, later renumbered Stalag-344, located near the small town of Lamsdorf (now called Łambinowice) in Silesia. It was opened in 1939 to house Polish prisoners from the German September 1939 offensive. Later approximately 100,000 prisoners from Australia, Belgium, British India, British Palestine, Canada, France, Greece, Italy, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Poland, South Africa, the Soviet Union, the United Kingdom, the Isle of Man, the United States and Yugoslavia passed through this camp. In 1941 a separate camp, Stalag VIII-F was set up close by to house the Soviet prisoners. In 1943, the Lamsdorf camp was split up, and many of the prisoners (and Arbeitskommando) were transferred to two new base camps Stalag VIII-C Sagan (modern Żagań and Stalag VIII-D Teschen (modern Český Těšín). The base camp at Lamsdorf was renumbered Stalag 344. The Soviet Army reached the camp on 17 March 1945. Later the Lamsdorf camp was used by the Soviets to house Germans, both prisoners of war and civilians. Polish army personnel being repatriated from POW camps were also processed through Lamsdorf and sometimes held there as prisoners for several months. Some were later released, others sent to Gulags in Siberia. By 1943, the famous camp for Allied flight personnel in Sagan - Stalag Luft III - had become so overcrowded that about 1,000, mostly non-commissioned flight personnel, were transferred to Lamsdorf. A part of Stalag VIII-B was separated by building new barbed-wire fences, designated Stalag Luft VIII-B. Thus a camp within a camp was created. However all food was provided from kitchens operated by army personnel in the camp proper. In January 1945, as the Soviet armies resumed their offensive and advanced into Germany, many of the prisoners were marched westward in groups of 200 to 300 in the so-called Death March. Many of them died from the bitter cold and exhaustion. The lucky ones got far enough to the west to be liberated by the American army. The unlucky ones got liberated by the Soviets, who instead of turning them over quickly to the western allies, held them as virtual hostages for several more months. Many of them were finally repatriated towards the end of 1945 through the port of Odessa on the Black Sea., 11 February, 1942
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