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Ukrainian Collaborationist Newspapers, Lvivski Vist, Krakivski Visti, and Wolyn

Overview

Abstract

Scope and Contents

Administrative Information

Detailed Description

RG-21.01, Krakivski Visti (Cracow Herald)

RG-21.02, Lvivski Vist (Lviv Herald)

RG-21.03, Wolyn, Volhnynia, periodical

RG-21.04, Ukrainian Word, Stanyslaviv

RG-21.05, The Stanislaviv Word (Stanislavivs'ke Slovo)

RG-21.06, Samostijna Ukraina (The Independent Ukraine) Stanislaviv



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Ukrainian Collaborationist Newspapers, Lvivski Vist, Krakivski Visti, and Wolyn, 1940-1945 | Los Angeles Museum of the Holocaust

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Collection Overview

Title: Ukrainian Collaborationist Newspapers, Lvivski Vist, Krakivski Visti, and Wolyn, 1940-1945Add to your cart.View associated digital content.

ID: RG-21/

Primary Creator: Lvivski Visti

Other Creators: Krakivski Visti, Wolyn (1941)

Extent: 0.0

Arrangement:

The arrangement scheme for the record group was imposed during processing in the absence of an original order. Materials are arranged by publication, then by identifier, as assigned by the processor.

Record group is comprised of three collections: 1. Krakivski Visti publications; 2. Lvivski Visti publications; 3. Wolyn publications.

Subjects: Collaboration between Ukrainian auxiliary police and German authorities, 1941 -- 1945, collaboration in the Holocaust, District Galicia (General Government: Administrative Unit), 1941 -- 1945, Documents in Ukrainian language, Eastern Galicia (Poland: Region), General Government (German-occupied Poland), 1939 -- 1945, Holocaust in Ukraine, Ideology of Ukrainian Nationalism, Krakivski Visti, Ukrainian collaborating with German Authorities periodical in Cracow, 1940 -- 1945, Lemberg (Poland: General Government: District Galicia), 1941 -- 1944, Lviv (Ukraine), Lvivski Visti, Ukrainian collaborating with German Authorities periodical, Lviv, 1940 --1944, Lwow (Poland), Narratives in Ukrainian language, Organization of Ukrainian Nationalists (OUN), periodicals, Ukrainian, Poland (1939 --1945), Theory of Ukrainian Nationalism, Ukraine (1939-1945), Ukrainian -- Jewish Relation under the Nazi-German regime in Eastern Galicia, 1941 -- 1944, Ukrainian - German Relations, 1939 -- 1941, Ukrainian - German Relations, 1941 -- 1945, Ukrainian administrative and police authorities in Eastern Galicia, 1941 -- 1944, Ukrainian Auxiliary Police, Ukrainian collaborating with German authorities periodicals in Cracow, 1940 --1945, Ukrainian collaborating with German authorities periodicals in Lviv, 1941 -- 1944, Ukrainian combat SS Division Galicia, 1944, Ukrainian military formations in the Second World War, 1939 -- 1945, Ukrainian national aspirations, Ukrainian political spectrum in Eastern Galicia, 1941 -- 1945, Ukrainian public organizations in Eastern Galicia under the Nazi-German regime, 1941 -- 1944, Ukrainian Society of East Galicia in relation to Nazi-German cause, 1939 --1945, Wolyn (Volhynia), Ukrainian collaborating periodical, 1941, Wolyn province (1940 -- 1945)

Forms of Material: Eastern Galicia (Ukraine: Region)

Languages: Ukrainian

Abstract

A selection of Ukrainian-language collaborating periodicals, published under the German occupation regime in Lviv (Eastern Galicia), Cracow (Western Galicia) and Wolyn (Volhynia) region. These periodicals replicated the German officialdom, were under German censorsship and propagated the doctrine of National Socialism.

In local matters, they typically appealed to Ukrainian population, asking to support the German-Nazi cause.

Scope and Contents of the Materials

This record group is comprised of the periodicals Krakivski Visti, Lvivski Visti, and Wolyn, a group of Ukrainian collaborator newspapers during the Second World War. Initiated by the Ukrainian civil administration, the publication of Ukrainian-language newspapers in German-occupied Galicia, Lvivski Visti and Krakivski Visti began publication soon after the German Army invaded first Poland (Krakivski Visti) and then the USSR (Lvivski Visti). Expropriation of formerly-owned Jewish publishing houses became possible as a result of the process called Aryanization (transferring of Jewish property to non-Jewish individuals or organizations). Thus Jewish publishing houses in Lviv and Cracow were aryanized and given to the Ukrainian organizations, which allowed for the publication of periodicals such as these.

All periodicals are digitized.

Collection Historical Note

Ukrainian newspapers followed official German ideology. They adopted anti-Bolshevik rhetoric, but emphasized Ukrainian economic and cultural development under German auspices. The editorial boards carried out a policy of soliciting Ukrainian support for the German cause. German administration limited the scope of both publications, Lvivski Visti and Krakivski Visti, to pure Ukrainian internal affairs and to the demonstration of Ukrainian support of the Nazis’ “New Order.” It was typical, within these publications, to not to give any accounts of the German genocidal policy, and largely, the editions resorted to silencing the mass killing of Jews in Galicia. Ukrainian newspapers presented the Jewish Question in light of the official Nazi propaganda, corollary to the Jewish world conspiracy.

Execution of the Final Solution was never a theme for the Ukrainian periodicals published under German control. This theme was restricted and, if reported, was limited to the short reports about the Ukrainian order police’s mundane activities. References to Ukrainian national movement (OUN) were also restricted, and, therefore, there were no reflections on the Movement of the Ukrainian Nationalists (OUN) and the activities of the Ukrainian Insurgent Army (UPA).

Everyday attention was given to economic and cultural life, and especially to the support of the German war effort. In 1943 and 1944, both Lvivski Visti and Krakivski Visti hailed the German-approved formation of the 14th Waffen SS Division Halychyna, composed of Ukrainian volunteers. Ukrainians prefered to see this formation, especially at the end of the war, as a nucleus for a future Ukrainian Army, calling it the First Ukrainian Rifle Division. Both newspapers serve as primary sources for life in the occupied territories and reflect the complex dynamic of the Ukrainian-German relations as they developed over the time.

Wolyn (Volhynia) was another Ukrainian-language collaborationist newspaper published in Rivne (Rowne). Wolyn was published in Reichskommissariat Ukraine (the former Soviet territory), while Lvivski Visti and Krakivski Visti were published in General Gouvernment (German-occupied Poland). German authorities divided the occupied Ukrainian territories between the General Gouvernment (occupied Poland) and Reichskommissariat Ukraine. Overall, German occupation regime was somewhat softer in the district of Galicia (General Gouvernment), compared to the Reichskommissariat Ukraine or the other Soviet-occupied territories.

Subject/Index Terms

Collaboration between Ukrainian auxiliary police and German authorities, 1941 -- 1945
collaboration in the Holocaust
District Galicia (General Government: Administrative Unit), 1941 -- 1945
Documents in Ukrainian language
Eastern Galicia (Poland: Region)
General Government (German-occupied Poland), 1939 -- 1945
Holocaust in Ukraine
Ideology of Ukrainian Nationalism
Krakivski Visti, Ukrainian collaborating with German Authorities periodical in Cracow, 1940 -- 1945
Lemberg (Poland: General Government: District Galicia), 1941 -- 1944
Lviv (Ukraine)
Lvivski Visti, Ukrainian collaborating with German Authorities periodical, Lviv, 1940 --1944
Lwow (Poland)
Narratives in Ukrainian language
Organization of Ukrainian Nationalists (OUN)
periodicals, Ukrainian
Poland (1939 --1945)
Theory of Ukrainian Nationalism
Ukraine (1939-1945)
Ukrainian -- Jewish Relation under the Nazi-German regime in Eastern Galicia, 1941 -- 1944
Ukrainian - German Relations, 1939 -- 1941
Ukrainian - German Relations, 1941 -- 1945
Ukrainian administrative and police authorities in Eastern Galicia, 1941 -- 1944
Ukrainian Auxiliary Police
Ukrainian collaborating with German authorities periodicals in Cracow, 1940 --1945
Ukrainian collaborating with German authorities periodicals in Lviv, 1941 -- 1944
Ukrainian combat SS Division Galicia, 1944
Ukrainian military formations in the Second World War, 1939 -- 1945
Ukrainian national aspirations
Ukrainian political spectrum in Eastern Galicia, 1941 -- 1945
Ukrainian public organizations in Eastern Galicia under the Nazi-German regime, 1941 -- 1944
Ukrainian Society of East Galicia in relation to Nazi-German cause, 1939 --1945
Wolyn (Volhynia), Ukrainian collaborating periodical, 1941
Wolyn province (1940 -- 1945)

Administrative Information

Repository: Los Angeles Museum of the Holocaust

Preferred Citation: RG-21, Ukrainian Collaborator Newspapers. Los Angeles Museum of the Holocaust Archive.

Processing Information: Materials are primarily described using the local descriptive standards of the LA Museum of the Holocaust.


Box and Folder Listing


Browse by Sub-Collection:

[Sub-Collection 1: RG-21.01, Krakivski Visti (Cracow Herald), 1940 -- 1945],
[Sub-Collection 2: RG-21.02, Lvivski Vist (Lviv Herald), 1941 -- 1944],
[Sub-Collection 3: RG-21.03, Wolyn, Volhnynia, periodical, 1941],
[Sub-Collection 4: RG-21.04, Ukrainian Word, Stanyslaviv, 1941 -- 1944],
[Sub-Collection 5: RG-21.05, The Stanislaviv Word (Stanislavivs'ke Slovo), 1942 -- 1943],
[Sub-Collection 6: RG-21.06, Samostijna Ukraina (The Independent Ukraine) Stanislaviv, July 1941],
[All]

Sub-Collection 5: RG-21.05, The Stanislaviv Word (Stanislavivs'ke Slovo), 1942 -- 1943Add to your cart.

Stanislaviv Word (Stanislavske Slovo) was a Ukrainian collaborationist periodical published in Stanislaviv (Stanislawow, Ivano – Frankivsk), Eastern Galicia under German occupation regime in the Second World War. This publication was somewhat an extension of the primary Ukrainian-language periodical, the Ukrainian Word (Ukrainske Slovo). Since 1943 it seemingly became a continuation if not a substitution for the Ukrainian Word.

Following the rules and provisions set up by the German administration of Eastern Galicia, the periodical emphasized priorities of a Ukrainian national cause, expressed vindictive to the Soviet stalinist  regime and criticized Jews for pro-Soviet position and the allies who fought against Germany.


Browse by Sub-Collection:

[Sub-Collection 1: RG-21.01, Krakivski Visti (Cracow Herald), 1940 -- 1945],
[Sub-Collection 2: RG-21.02, Lvivski Vist (Lviv Herald), 1941 -- 1944],
[Sub-Collection 3: RG-21.03, Wolyn, Volhnynia, periodical, 1941],
[Sub-Collection 4: RG-21.04, Ukrainian Word, Stanyslaviv, 1941 -- 1944],
[Sub-Collection 5: RG-21.05, The Stanislaviv Word (Stanislavivs'ke Slovo), 1942 -- 1943],
[Sub-Collection 6: RG-21.06, Samostijna Ukraina (The Independent Ukraine) Stanislaviv, July 1941],
[All]


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