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Personal Memoirs, Testimonies and Diaries

Overview

Abstract

Scope and Contents

Biographical Note

Administrative Information

Detailed Description

Anna Przeworska-Pratt papers

Siegfried Halbreich papers

Barry Ziff papers

Anna Lipszyc papers

RG-01.01, Irena Lusky Collection

RG-01.07, Erica Leon Testimony

RG-01.10, Marta Mitdank testimony

RG-01.12,  Ludwik Hirshfeld memoir

RG-01.15, Alice Schragai memoir

RG-01.16, Central Committee of Liberated Jews in U.S. Zone of Occupation in Germany papers

RG-01.17, Otto Herskovic memoir

John van Huzun wartime diary the Netherlands

Collection of Dachau diaries and letters

Betti Gerard papers

Dawid Gertler papers

Josef Broide papers

Henryk Gliksman papers

Nika Fleissig papers



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Personal Memoirs, Testimonies and Diaries, 1918 -- 1996 | Los Angeles Museum of the Holocaust

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Collection Overview

Title: Personal Memoirs, Testimonies and Diaries, 1918 -- 1996Add to your cart.View associated digital content.

Predominant Dates:1920s -- 1950s

ID: RG-01/RG-01

Primary Creator: Lusky, Irena (ca. 1925-)

Other Creators: Broide, Josef, Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US zone of occupation in Germany (1945 -- 1952), Epstein, Estera, Fleissig, Nika (1919-), Gerard, Betti (1934-), Gertler, Dawid, Gliksman, Henryk, Halbreich, Siegfried (1909-), Herskovic, Otto, Hirszfeld, Ludwik (1884-1954), Jonski, Jozef (1912-), Legal Department of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US Zone of Occupation in Germany, Leon, Erica, Lipszyc, Anna (1918-), Mitdank, Marta, Schragai, Alice, van Huzun, John, Ziff, Barry

Extent: 0.0

Arrangement:

The arrangement scheme for the record group was imposed during processing in the absence of an original order. Materials are arranged by creator, then by identifier, as assigned by the processor.

Record group is comprised of thirteen collections and five items, the collections of which are: 1. Nika Fleissig papers; 2. Collection of Dachau diaries and letters; 3. Anna Przeworska-Pratt papers; 4. Siegfried Halbreich papers; 5. Barry Ziff papers; 8. Anna Lipszyc papers; 9. Betty Gerard papers; 10. Dawid Gertler papers; 11. Josef Brojde papers; 12. Henryk Gliksman papers; 13. Central Committee of Liberated Jews in U.S. Zone of Occupation in Germany papers.

Subjects: Accusation and suspicion of collaboration in the Holocaust, Allied Military and Civil administration in Germany, Collaboration in ghettos, collaboration in the Holocaust, Collaboration of Jewish Administration in the Holocaust, Immigration to Israel, Immigration to United States, Jewish-Gentile relations, Jewish courts of honor, Jewish courts of honor--Munich (Germany), Legal defense in the Jewish courts of Honor, Means of adaptation and survival in concentration camps, Means of adaptation and survival in the ghettos, personal diaries, postwar life in Europe, survival tactics

Forms of Material: Diaries--Wartime, Memoirs, Memoirs--Post-WWII, Personal memoirs and recollections, Personal testimonies

Languages: English, German, Polish, Yiddish

Abstract

This Record Group is composed of 18 sub-record groups, all devoted to personal and collective memoirs and testimonies, recorded soon after the Second World War. There a few narratives narrated during the wartime.

They reflect various aspects of prewar life, survival under Nazi occupation: ghetto and camp experience, hiding, false identity, resistance activity, liberation, and immigration to the countries of current residence. There are several diaries kept in the camp, ghetto, and in the partisan unit. The original records are in English, German, Polish, and Yiddish. Largely, the documents are partially or fully translated in English. Sub-groups or individual collections within this record group comprise original documents, photographs, artifacts, as well as non-original copies and secondary publications.

Scope and Contents of the Materials

The record group contains memoirs, testimonies, and other recollections written before, during, and after the war. They reflect various aspects of prewar life, survival under Nazi occupation--ghetto and camp experience, hiding, false identity, resistance activity--liberation, and immigration. There are several diaries kept in the camp, ghetto, and in the partisan unit. The collections also comprise of original documents, photographs, artifacts, digitized materials, as well as non-original copies and secondary source publications.

Largely, the documents are partially or fully translated in English, but there are also original documents in German, Polish, and Yiddish.

Collection Historical Note

This macro Record Group comprises archival narratives, photodocuments, correspondences and other form of wartime recollections. It is subdivided into 18 sub-record groups. Largely, it is unified by the common theme, that is, reflections on the Holocaust. These narrated reflections vary content and form. Overall, they describe, personal, family and community experience during and after the Holocaust. These narratives are penned by Jewish, non-Jewish authors, as well as by the Jewish organizations and officials. All 18 sub-record groups are unified by a common denominator, namely the analysis and insight of the personally experienced tragedy of the Holocaust, War and postwar difficulties.

Biographical Note

Irena Lusky, née Deuel, was born ca. 1925 in Kaunas (Kovno), Lithuania in an upper middle-class, well educated, and assimilated Jewish family. She describes her childhood experiences in the well-off family focusing on the interfamily relations between herself, her parents, her grandparents, and her sister. Further, Irena Lusky’s narrative depicts a certain strata of Jewish intelligentsia of interwar Lithuania.

The period of 1940-1941, during the Soviet annexation of Lithuania, is reflected through the prism of a young adult’s comprehension of social and political changes taking place in mundane life, as well as of the events jeopardizing the very existence of their family. The latter is related to their arrest and initial stage of deportation, and their release from the transport to Siberia at the last moment. The Deuel family was freed due to the influential intervention of Dr. Finkelstein, an old family friend, who was in high esteem by the new Communist government of Lithuania.

The Deuel family was exposed to the war hardships from the first day, June 22, 1941, when Germany invaded the Soviet Union. After a failed flight attempt, they returned to German-occupied Vilnius (Vilna). While en route to Vilnius, they were arrested several times. Although, at that initial stage of German occupation, it was still possible for them to be released from jail either with the help of bribery or simply appealing to “a good German.”

Irena Lusky describes the life in the Vilna ghetto from two perspectives: first and foremost as a young adult experiencing all ghetto hardships and second, to a lesser extent, as a memoir writer of late 1970s. This latter perspective shows the post-Holocaust interpretations together with the author’s personal reckoning. Overall, this combination of two uncorrelated perspectives culminates in the authentic and independent account with regard to the various sides of ghetto life. Ghetto inhabitants, Judenrat members, resistance activities, German authorities, and numerous existential situations are reflected in the narrative. The reader will find among other such reflections, the author’s insights on Jewish leadership as a whole and specifically on such controversial figure as Jacob Gens, the head of the Judenrat and the Jewish Police Force in the ghetto.  The Wittenberg Affair is also accounted as the author’s first-hand experience.

Irena was also only indirectly involved in the FPO (Fareinikte Partizaner Organizatsie—United Partisan Organization) and therefore did not join its members in escaping from the ghetto into the forest to continue the partisan struggle. The FPO decided to leave the ghetto before it was liquidated. The Deuel family survived the liquidation of the ghetto only to face German selection. In September 1943, the remaining ghetto inhabitants were taken outside the city into an open field called Rossa for the selection. The first stage of selection separated male and female family members. Irena would never see again her Father, Dr. Finkelstein, and her boyfriend Gamek Sturman. The next stage of selection resulted in the separation of Irena and Tamara from their mother. The Germans directed the daughters to the right, while their mother was sent to the left.  The sisters sensed that “right” meant life and some hope, while the people sent on the left were doomed. Irena remembers how her mother was calmed and pleased by seeing the daughters on the life side. Irena and Tamar Deuel were deported to the Kaiserwald concentration camp near Riga, Latvia.

After a ten-week imprisonment in Kaiserwald, Irena and Tamara were transferred to the AEG factory in Riga, a labor camp officially referred as Riga-Strasdenhof camp, where they lived at worked. The conditions there were slightly better than in the Kaiserwald camp. In 1944, with the Soviet Army nearing Riga, the Germans evacuated AEG labor camp to Toruń (Thorn), Poland. Here, another underground factory was to be set up in the former castle, designated as “Fort 13.” Irena Deuel (Lusky) remained in Thorn-AEG, the official camp name, through December 1944. At the end of December 1944, the female prisoners of the Thorn-AEG camp were forced to march west, in the direction of Germany. Being badly wearied and ultimately starved, the prisoners were compelled to keep pace under German command.

Irena Deuel managed to escape from the forced march when the column was passing the city of Bydgoszcz (Bromberg), Poland. She ran up to a house and begged for shelter. Only after the long persuasion, a Polish woman let Irena in. After a week of hiding, in January 1945, the entering Soviet Army liberated Irena and the other girls at their hideout. Wandering through the streets of Bydgoszcz, Irena met her sister Tamara and other girls from the camp. Soon after their group left Bydgoszcz for central Poland and headed for Lublin, then a Polish provisional capital. In Lublin Irena learned that her Mother, Father, and Gamek had not survived. Her father was killed in the Klooga concentration camp, Estonia. Her mother was gassed in Majdanek concentration camp, and Gamek died of typhus.

It was in Lublin that Irena, Tamara, and a few other Jewish girls joined the Bricha Movement (an organized Jewish illegal immigration movement from East-Central Europe through the allied-occupied zones to the British-Mandate Palestine). Eventually Irena met the former Vilna Jewish partisan commander Abba Kovner, who was in charge of Bricha operations in East-Central Europe. This meeting played a decisive role in her future when she made a commitment to Palestine, her eventual Jewish home. In total, Irena’s journey to Palestine lasted from March 1945 to January 1946. After a year and a half of wandering through Romania, Hungary, Austria, and Italy, their group finally arrived in the British-mandated Palestine in January 1946. She, as thousands of others at that time, was an illegal Jewish immigrant brought there by the means of another clandestine Jewish movement-- Aliyah Bet, under the patronization of the Jewish Brigade. Upon their arrival to Haifa, the British authorities interned all the repatriates from their ship in the Atlit internment camp.

Eventually the Jewish Agency provided the internees with appropriate papers, and the British set them free. Her first encounter with fellow Jews in a kibbutz was a disappointment to Irena’s expectations and visions for a free and peaceful life in her Jewish state. Irena highly resented the indifference the locals showed to the newcomers in particular, and to the fate of European Jewry during the Holocaust in general.

It was not until Irena Deuel met Maikel Levin in the summer of 1946 that she began to feel differently about herself and the people around her.  Confidence, sympathy, and hope had again filled her life. Having met Maikel at the party, she moved to the Beit Zera kibbutz, on the bank of the Jordan River, near the Sea of Galilee, to be with him. Maikel was a real pioneer and a patriot of the Land. His love helped Irena to appreciate the land and people of Israel. She soon married Maikel and for a while, the couple continued to live at the kibbutz. Irena did not fit into kibbutz work and although she tried her best, kibbutzniks were not satisfied with her. Eventually, it was Maikel’s decision to leave the kibbutz and settle down in a town.

They settled in Givatayim and with the help of a friend Maikel found a job and an apartment. Although they lacked money and situation of the country worsened with every day, they were happy. Adding to this happiness, she became pregnant and looked with hope to the future. On 14 May 1948, independence and establishment of the Jewish State in Eretz-Israel was proclaimed. The war for independence had begun. As a Haganah soldier, Maikel was called up for service. He had to arrive to the Recruitment Center on 18 May 1948. He left home in the morning heading first for work and then, after the workday, to the Recruitment Center. The war between the Israelis and Arabs had already begun, with Jerusalem under siege and local skirmishes beginning to erupt in many places. On that day, 18 May 1948, an explosion at the Central Bus Station, perpetrated by the terrorists, killed Maikel Levin. Irena remained unaware of his fate until the next morning. She was then eight-month pregnant.

In a month Irena gave birth to a girl, but was going through an extremely hard time and suffered mentally and physically. As she recalls, “I was hardly alive, little I comprehended what was going around me.” She could not even take care of her daughter Michal. Eventually time cured her wounds; she remarried to Shimon Lusky, and gave birth to another child, a son. In the 1970s, she was still living in Israel, her past never having left her. She took up this writing with the intention to separate herself from this burden and to place her personal vision, recollections, and reflections in a literary, truthful, and intimate account of her and her time.

Subject/Index Terms

Accusation and suspicion of collaboration in the Holocaust
Allied Military and Civil administration in Germany
Collaboration in ghettos
collaboration in the Holocaust
Collaboration of Jewish Administration in the Holocaust
Immigration to Israel
Immigration to United States
Jewish-Gentile relations
Jewish courts of honor
Jewish courts of honor--Munich (Germany)
Legal defense in the Jewish courts of Honor
Means of adaptation and survival in concentration camps
Means of adaptation and survival in the ghettos
personal diaries
postwar life in Europe
survival tactics

Administrative Information

Repository: Los Angeles Museum of the Holocaust

Access Restrictions: No restrictions

Use Restrictions:

Copyrighted materials, credits to and references to the Los Angeles Museum of the Holocaust are required

Digital copies might be available upon request

Preferred Citation: RG-01, Personal Memoirs, Testimonies and Diaries. Los Angeles Museum of the Holocaust Archive.

Processing Information: Materials are primarily described using the local descriptive standards of the LA Museum of the Holocaust.


Box and Folder Listing


Browse by Sub-Collection:

[Sub-Collection RG-01.04: Anna Przeworska-Pratt papers, 1939 -1973],
[Sub-Collection RG-01.05: Siegfried Halbreich papers, 1939 -- 1970s],
[Sub-Collection RG-01.06: Barry Ziff papers, 1944-1945],
[Sub-Collection RG-01.08: Anna Lipszyc papers, 1939 -- 1946],
[Folder 6: RG-01.01, Irena Lusky Collection, 1976 -- 1977],
[Folder 7: RG-01.07, Erica Leon Testimony],
[Folder 8: RG-01.10, Marta Mitdank testimony, 15 October 1946],
[Folder 9: RG-01.12,  Ludwik Hirshfeld memoir, 1946],
[Folder 10: RG-01.15, Alice Schragai memoir, 21 January 1982],
[Sub-Collection 11: RG-01.16, Central Committee of Liberated Jews in U.S. Zone of Occupation in Germany papers, 1946-1949],
[Collection of Folder-Level 12: RG-01.17, Otto Herskovic memoir, 1946],
[Sub-Collection RG-01.18: John van Huzun wartime diary the Netherlands, 1944-1945],
[Sub-Collection RG-01.03: Collection of Dachau diaries and letters, 1933-1945],
[Sub-Collection RG-01.09: Betti Gerard papers, 1936-1949],
[Sub-Collection RG-01.11: Dawid Gertler papers, 1948-1949],
[Sub-Collection RG-01.13: Josef Broide papers, 1979],
[Sub-Collection RG-01.14: Henryk Gliksman papers, 1948-1949],
[Sub-Collection RG-01.02: Nika Fleissig papers, ca. 1920-1989],
[All]

Sub-Collection 11: RG-01.16, Central Committee of Liberated Jews in U.S. Zone of Occupation in Germany papers, 1946-1949Add to your cart.

This collection is comprised of materials related to the Central Committee’s activities, particularly with regard to easing the process of obtaining personal documents from the Polish consulates in Germany. It also includes documents outlining establishment and functioning of the Jewish courts of honor in Germany; materials prepared for restitution claims; official correspondences between agencies; and judicial documents of trials.

In particular, the Central Committee of Liberated Jews focused on establishing a dialogue with, the new Polish authorities in order to resolve the following issues:

                                                                                                                   

1. Restoration of ownership of the Jewish estates remaining in Poland.  Enabling the processes of succession.

2. Arguing about the fixed fees for the claim process that shall not be corollary of the property value.

3. Prolonging the deadline for submitting claims for the war damages.

4. Easing the issuance of the duplicates from the prewar wedding acts and birth

certificates. To ease this process, it was proposed that the testimonies of two witnesses would suffice as a proof. Having the testimonies of two witnesses, the Legal Department of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in Germany may officially reinstate the prewar Polish certificate attaching the stamp of their own. This provisional document would be regarded sufficient for the Office of Civil Status in Poland. This Office would eventually issue and deliver a proper document to the Central Committee in Germany.

5. The Central Committee discussed numerous complaints submitted by the Polish citizens in German about understaffed Polish Consulates in Germany resultant in inefficient business.

6. The Central discussed difficulties of re-issuance of Polish passports to the Polish citizens. It was requested to ease this process on the part of the Polish Consulate in Frankfurt. The Central Committee pointed out that  the Polish Consulate requires submitting of 17 supporting documents in order to obtain a new Polish passport.

Language of the documents: Yiddish (using Latin script), Polish, English, German.

Location: U.S. Occupation Zone in Germany, Bavaria, Munich

Time period: 1946 – 1947

List of names which frequently appear in correspondences and other documents:

Attorney Estera Epstein

Dr. Aleksander Celniker

Henryk Goldring

Attorney W. Friedheim

Dr. M. Verstandig

Organization, handwritten and typewritten documents. This record group includes digitized materials.

Language, Yiddish, German, Polish, English

RG-01.16.01, Memorandum, Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US zone in Germany

Type of document: Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US zone in Germany, Memorandum to Estera Epstein, lawyer

Language: Yiddish (in Latin script)

Date: January 30th 1949

RG-01.16.02, Conference notes taken on a Polish military mission, Berlin, September 1947

Type of document: Handwritten notes

Author: unknown (although handwriting shows similar characters to Estera Epstein’s previous documents)

Language: Polish

Date: September 4 – 6th, 1947

Document contains 14 pages of handwritten notes, taken during the conference, which took place between 4th and 6th of September 1947 at the Polish military mission in Berlin. The following delegates of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US zone in Germany attended the Conference, attorney Estera Epstein, Dr. Aleksander Celniker and Henryk Goldring.

The Polish government was represented by Lieutenant-Colonel Stanislaw Gebert. The main themes of the conference read as follows, restitution claims, a need to prepare the new, appropriate forms for the restoration of full powers of ownership, and applications for opening and closing the processes of succession. Another important issue discussed was a request to extend a deadline for applications for compensation of war damages and applications for restitutions.

RG-01.16.03, Letter to the Legal Department of Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Warsaw, sent via Polish military mission in Berlin

This letter was compiled by Dr. A. Celinikier, Director of Legal Department of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews, P. Piekacz, President of Central Committee of Liberated Jews, attorney W. Friedheim, Chairman of Federation of Jews form Poland, and Dr. M. Verstandig, Director of Legal Department of the Federation of Jews from Poland.

The letter contains a number of requests to the Polish Government, specifically to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Since enormous material and mental damages have been inflicted on the Jews of Poland in the Second World War, the authors requested to adopt the certain changes to the Polish legislature.  If adopted, these changes would be of significant help to the remaining Polish Jews. The authors pointed to the unresolved issues of property restitutions, regaining of the Polish passports, and also emphasized complaints about work efficiency and the willingness to help on the part of staff of the Polish Consular outposts.

Language: Polish

Date: October 1st 1947

RG-01.16.04, Handwritten notes about the Jewish Court of Honor

Handwritten notes

In the beginning of October 1945, the first “Jewish Court” was established in the US zone in Germany, in Landsberg, Bavaria. The office in Landsberg included the Jewish Court and Prosecution Office. The following professionals worked in the Jewish Court in Landsberg:

Dr. Samuel Gringauz, Judge (Chairman of DP camp in Landsberg

Natan Markowski, a member of management/ administration

Benjamin Abelski, Chief of Jewish Police in Landsberg DP camp

<p style="margin-left:.5in;"> Dr. Josef Frammer, a physician by profession and a member of Rehabilitation Committee of the DP camp

In the Prosecution Counsel Office was Dr. Shlomo Orenstein, an attorney who used to work as a prosecutor in Lodz, Poland. He was the first Jewish prosecutor in the American zone of occupation in Germany.

The notes were also taken on the following subjects:

<p style="margin-left:.5in;"> - First attempts to establish certain procedures and regulations dealing with the crimes in the camps, etc.

Type of document: Handwritten notes

Author: attorney Estera Epstein

Language: Yiddish

         

RG-01.16.05, Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US zone of occupation in Germany, Memorandum, in Polish

One typed page on the letterhead of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US zone of occupation in Germany; with headquarters in Munich. This memorandum specifies four major themes on which the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US zone of occupation in Germany concentrates its efforts. These subjects were:

1. Compensations of war damages. It was requested to extend a deadline for registration.

2. Text of the new legislation for succession.

3. The list of lawyers in Poland.

4. Improving the service rendering to all petitioners by the Polish consular posts.

Type of document: one typed page

Author: unknown

Language: English, Polish

Date: unknown

RG-01.16.06, A notice from the Legal Department of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the U.S. zone of occupation in Germany regarding a positive decision granted by the American administration in the matter of Jewish judicial activities. An official status of the Jewish Court of Honor has been recognized.

The Legal Department of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the American zone of occupation in Germany states that it has received a positive decision from the Americans. It supports the related pursuits undertaken by the Jewish judiciary and Jewish Court over the DP camps in the U.S. zone of occupation in Germany.

Type of document: Statement

Author: Department of Public Relations of Central Committee of Liberated Jews in US zone of occupation in Germany

Language: Yiddish, Polish, English

Date:  November 20th, 1946

RG-01.16.07, Business trip arrangements and permissions issued by the American military authorities to Henryk Goldring, Legal Department of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US zone of occupation in Germany; Dr. Alexander Celnikier, Legal Department of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US zone of occupation in Germany; Dr. Esther Epstein, Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US zone of occupation in Germany. The aforementioned officials are allowed to travel on business from Munich to Berlin.

On the 2nd of September 1947, the Headquarters of 7822 Station Complement Unit (US Military Government in Germany) issued a Travel Document for aforementioned persons travelling on business from Munich to Berlin on the 2nd of September 1947 and 9th of September 1947. The purpose of this trip was to confer with the officials of the Polish Military Mission in Berlin. They were authorized to commute in both directions.

The travel arrangements have been authorized by Colonel George R. Scithers, Liaison Officer of the EUCOM Liaison Office. The cost of transportation was charged to the respective funds of American administration.

Type of document: Authorization for transportation

Issued by U.S. Military Authorities

Language: English

Date:  September 2, 1947

RG-01.16.08, Memorandum issued by the Legal Department of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in U.S. zone of occupation in Germany. This Memorandum, issued by the Legal Department, inquired about the legal status of the local Jewish courts and also about their judicial activities. There was also a structural determination on the status and role of the central and local courts designated by the Central Jewish Court in Munich.

Memorandum, the text,

Legal Department of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the American zone of occupation in Germany appeal to all local and Rayonscomitees (District Committees) of the Liberated Jews in the American zone of occupation in Germany.

Subject: Judicature

We request the following to be declared immediately,

a)        If there is a court established in your committee. If yes, please provide the list of its members.

b)        Please specify legal criteria that guide the court in rendering decisions.

c)        Please inform if your court has the power to impose imprisonments.

d)        Please inform on how many cases the court had completed by now.

We notify that our court made the following decisions at its plenary meeting:

1.        On our part the Legal Department states that their Jewish Court of Honor in Munich rules as second and the last instance with regard to all other Jewish courts of honor. The local courts can thus only rule as the courts of the first instance.

2.        Every judgment or ruling of the court of the first instance can be appealed to our court of the second and final instance.

3.        The appellation term is limited to 14 days.

4.        The appellate court is empowered to use reformatio in peius, a Latin term for revising a decision of the court of the first instance.

5.        A presiding judge of the court of the first instance has to inform the convict of instructions 1-4 after the judgment had been pronounced.

It is also stated that the Jewish Court of Honor in Munich was the first and last instance for potential rehabilitation applications for the members of the local-and Rayonscomitees (District Committees) when there were no claimants.

The Jewish Court of Honor is located at ZK, Moehlstrasse 12a, room 16.

We expect your immediate reply

Signed by the Legal Department of the Central Committee of the Liberated Jews in the US zone of occupation in Germany.

Type of document: Memorandum issued by the Legal Department of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US zone of occupation in Germany to the local Jewish courts.

Language: German

Date: unknown

RG-01.16.09, Handwritten notes by attorney, Estera Epstein

RG-01.16.10, Handwritten List of 72 names.

These are the names of the individuals whose wartime and post-wartime activities were investigated by the Legal Department of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US zone of occupation in Germany. They were charged with various crimes ranging from illegal actions in DP camps to more serious accusations of collaboration with the German-Nazi administrations in the occupied territories

This List does not refer to a specific DP camps in the American zone of occupation in Germany where the people in question resided. Gleaned from the other documents, especially considering the testimony of Anna Przeworska – Pratt (Testimony of Anna Przeworska (Estera Epstein) in Polish in the form of a letter to a former Polish colleague, RG – 01.04, pages: 13 - 16) most likely the list was from a DP camp in Landsberg.

There is a short note in reference to the given names. The note speaks specifically to their crimes, charges, time served in prison and so on. The cases varied from wartime collaboration with the German administration in the ghettos and concentration camps, to petty crimes like stealing food or clothing in a particular DP camp.

<p align="center"> List of individuals against whom the charges were pressed by the Jewish Court of Honor

1.        Halina Poznanska

2.        Horowicz Heniek, Milsztajn Hersz

3.        Seweryn Cwajg

4.        Israel Friedman

5.        Dawid Imerglik

6.        Leon Pierocki, Elbani Cyjon

7.        Szmul Majerowicz

8.        Szmul Werner

9.        Josef Aleks

10.      Wolf Krzak

11.      Daniel Sieradzki

12.      Majlek Winnik, Boris Blum, Ajzyk Kolpenicki

13.      Mieczyslaw Bauczuk

14.      Wiktor Jakubson, Eugen Borknn

15.      Abram Helmer

16.      Salomon Sasson

17.      Szloma Fajnberg

18.      Szloma Fajgenberg

19.      Szecawski

20.      Moses Melamed

21.      Marysia Warszpieprz

22.      Maurycy Pinkas

23.      Rozenbaum Kalma and Aron, Sochaczewski Aron

24.      Anna Rulc

25.      Hersz Fajnbaum

26.      Herszl Martm

27.      Cesia Ajchenwald

28.      Dwora Kozlowska

29.      Izaak Nelken

30.      Pola Maroko

31.      Szmul Rakowski

32.      Chaim Berzuk

33.      Lewi Chil

34.      Szyja Bergman

35.      Hersz Fajchman

36.      Jesiejel Munk

37.      Julja Roth

38.      Balon, Farber, Salilan

39.      Mendel Adler, Imra Hoch,

40.      Awraham Dzingel

41.      Wolf Zelkowicz

42.      Jakow Miligram

43.      Illegible

44.      Misza Grabowski

45.      Izaak Frajberg

46.      Mufeld Duchan

47.      Szlojmo Halpern

47.      Moses Sandor

48.      Wolf Maler

49.      Samaj

50.      Dawid Szyniecki

51.      Mojsze Liber

52.      Zawadzki, Zeligson, Praszker

53.      Szalom Kazanowski

54.      Izrael Fudalowicz

55.      Abram Buksbanm, Abram Wulkan

56.      Moris Barcyjan

57.      Rumakowski

58.      Mendel Kenigstein

59.      Jakow Bomstein

60.      Jakob Fajgenbaum

61.      Joel Liber

62.      Bernard Frajberg

63.      Tamar Beker

64.      Abraham Szalenstein

65.      Lrla Bialowierska

66.      Adolf Szenbach

67.      Abram Nachtigal

68.      Berysz Herszlikowicz

69.      Mojsze Fridenzon

70.      Friedberg

71.      Englender

72.      Zlotykamien

Type of document: Handwritten notes

Author: unknown (although handwriting shows the pattern of writing characteristic to Estera Epstein)

Language: Yiddish (in Latin script), Polish

Date:  unknown

Arrangement: The arrangement scheme for the record group was imposed during processing in the absence of an original order. Materials are arranged by identifier, as assigned by the processor.
Extent: This collection is comprised of ten items.
Language of Material: Yiddish, German, Polish, and English
Subject/Index Terms:
Confiscation of Jewish property without German authorization
Jewish property attacks
Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US Occupation Zone of Germany
Lost property recovery
Displaced persons camps
Court of honor of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US Occupation Zone of Germany
Jewish courts of honor
Restitution
Restitution-related documents
Identification documents
U.S. zone of occupation
Munich (Germany)
U.S. zone of occupation--Germany
Bavaria (Germany)
Epstein, Estera
Celniker, Dr. Aleksander
Goldring, Henryk
Friedheim, W.
Verstandig, Dr. M.
Creators:
Legal Department of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US Zone of Occupation in Germany
Folder 1: RG-01.16.01, Memorandum, Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US zone in Germany, 30 January 1949Add to your cart.
Narrated by Estera Epstein, attorney. Outlines principles, conceptions and problems with regard to the activity of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US zone of occupation in Germany.  The document is written in Yiddish using Latin script.
Subject/Index Terms:
Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US Occupation Zone of Germany
Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US zone of occupation in Germany, activities
Relations between the Central Committee of Liberated Jews and Polish government
Relations between the Central Committee of Liberated Jews and US Military Government  in Germany
Postwar Jewish immigration from Germany
Collaboration in ghettos
Judenraete (Jewish councils)
Jewish courts of honor
Epstein, Estera
narratives in Yiddish
Documents in Yiddish language
Germany (1945 -- 1949)
Yiddish, language
Creators:
Epstein, Estera
Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US zone of occupation in Germany (1945 -- 1952)
Document/Artifact of Item-Level 1: RG-01.16.01.01, Memorandum, Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US zone in Germany, Part 1, 30 January 1949Add to your cart.
Narrated by Estera Epstein, attorney. Outlines principles, conceptions and problems with regard to the activity of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US zone of occupation in Germany. The document is written in Yiddish using Latin script. Part 1 of 2.
Subject/Index Terms:
Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US Occupation Zone of Germany
Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US zone of occupation in Germany, activities
Collaboration in ghettos
Documents in Yiddish language
Epstein, Estera
Germany (1945--1949)
Jewish courts of honor
Judenraete (Jewish councils)
narratives in Yiddish
Postwar Jewish immigration from Germany
Relations between the Central Committee of Liberated Jews and Polish government
Relations between the Central Committee of Liberated Jews and US Military Government  in Germany
Yiddish, language
Creators:
Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US zone of occupation in Germany (1945 -- 1952)
Epstein, Estera
Document/Artifact of Item-Level 2: RG-01.16.01.02, Memorandum, Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US zone in Germany, Part 2, 30 January 1949Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
Narrated by Estera Epstein, attorney. Outlines principles, conceptions and problems with regard to the activity of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US zone of occupation in Germany. The document is written in Yiddish using Latin script. Part 2 of 2.
Subject/Index Terms:
Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US Occupation Zone of Germany
Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US zone of occupation in Germany, activities
Collaboration in ghettos
Documents in Yiddish language
Germany (1945 -- 1949)
Jewish courts of honor
Judenraete (Jewish councils)
narratives in Yiddish
Postwar Jewish immigration from Germany
Relations between the Central Committee of Liberated Jews and Polish government
Relations between the Central Committee of Liberated Jews and US Military Government  in Germany
Yiddish, language
Creators:
Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US zone of occupation in Germany (1945 -- 1952)
Epstein, Estera
Folder 2: RG-01.16.02, Conference notes taken at the Polish military mission, Berlin, September 1947, 4--6 September 1947Add to your cart.

The Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US zone of occupation in Germany took an initiative to settle the issues of restitutions, compensations, recovery of property on behalf of Polish Jews who temporarily resided in displaced persons caps or elsewhere in Germany. Questions of reinstatement of Polish passports for the former Polish citizens have been also discussed. Issuance of various certificates by Polish authorities for the former Polish citizens resided in Germany or elsewhere was also a subject of discussion.

This document contains 14 pages of handwritten notes, taken during the conference, which took place between the 4th and 6th of September 1947 at the Polish military mission in Berlin.  The following delegates of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US zone in Germany attended teh Conference: attorney Estera Epstein, Dr. Aleksander Celniker, and Henryk Goldring.

The Polish government was represented by Liutenant-Colonel Stanislaw Gebert.  The main themes of the conference reads as follows: restitution claims, a need to prepare the new, appropriate forms for the restoration of full powers of ownership, and applications for opening and closing the processes of succession.  Another important issue discussed was a request to extend a deadline for applications for compensations of war damages and applications for restitutions.

Subject/Index Terms:
Wartime restitutions
recovery of property
Reinstatement of passports
Issuance of certificates
Consular support
Polish military representation in Germany, postwar
Polish consulates in Germany, postwar
Repatriation to Poland, postwar
Jewish courts of honor
Judenraete (Jewish councils)
Collaboration in ghettos
Collaboration of Jewish Administration in the Holocaust
Poland (1945--1991)
Unknown author of conference notes taken on a Polish military mission, Berlin, September 1947
Polish, language
Narratives in Polish language
Documents in Polish language
Creators:
Epstein, Estera
unknown author of conference notes taken on a Polish military mission, Berlin, September 1947 (September 4 – 6, 1947)
Document/Artifact of Item-Level 1: RG-01.16.02.01, Conference notes taken on a Polish military mission, Berlin, September 1947, Part 1, 4--6 September 1947Add to your cart.View associated digital content.

The Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US zone of occupation in Germany took an initiative to settle the issues of restitutions, compensations, recovery of property on behalf of Polish Jews who temporarily resided in displaced persons caps or elsewhere in Germany. Questions of reinstatement of Polish passports for the former Polish citizens have been also discussed. Issuance of various certificates by Polish authorities for the former Polish citizens resided in Germany or elsewhere was also a subject of discussion.

This document contains 14 pages of handwritten notes, taken during the conference, which took place between the 4th and 6th of September 1947 at the Polish military mission in Berlin.  The following delegates of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US zone in Germany attended teh Conference: attorney Estera Epstein, Dr. Aleksander Celniker, and Henryk Goldring.

The Polish government was represented by Lieutenant-Colonel Stanislaw Gebert.  The main themes of the conference reads as follows: restitution claims, a need to prepare the new, appropriate forms for the restoration of full powers of ownership, and applications for opening and closing the processes of succession.  Another important issue discussed was a request to extend a deadline for applications for compensations of war damages and applications for restitutions. Part 1 of 4

Subject/Index Terms:
Collaboration in ghettos
Collaboration of Jewish Administration in the Holocaust
Consular support
Issuance of certificates
Jewish courts of honor
Judenraete (Jewish councils)
Polish consulates in Germany, postwar
Polish military representation in Germany, postwar
recovery of property
Reinstatement of passports
Repatriation to Poland, postwar
Wartime restitutions
Poland (1945--1991)
Unknown author of conference notes taken on a Polish military mission, Berlin, September 1947
Polish, language
Narratives in Polish language
Documents in Polish language
Creators:
Epstein, Estera
unknown author of conference notes taken on a Polish military mission, Berlin, September 1947 (September 4 – 6, 1947)
Document/Artifact of Item-Level 2: RG-01.16.02.02, Conference notes taken on a Polish military mission, Berlin, September 1947, Part 2, 4--6 September 1947Add to your cart.View associated digital content.

The Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US zone of occupation in Germany took an initiative to settle the issues of restitution, compensations, recovery of property on behalf of Polish Jews who temporarily resided in displaced persons caps or elsewhere in Germany. Questions of reinstatement of Polish passports for the former Polish citizens have been also discussed. Issuance of various certificates by Polish authorities for the former Polish citizens resided in Germany or elsewhere was also a subject of discussion.

This document contains 14 pages of handwritten notes, taken during the conference, which took place between the 4th and 6th of September 1947 at the Polish military mission in Berlin.  The following delegates of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US zone in Germany attended the Conference: attorney Estera Epstein, Dr. Aleksander Celniker, and Henryk Goldring.

The Polish government was represented by Lieutenant-Colonel Stanislaw Gebert.  The main themes of the conference reads as follows: restitution claims, a need to prepare the new, appropriate forms for the restoration of full powers of ownership, and applications for opening and closing the processes of succession.  Another important issue discussed was a request to extend a deadline for applications for compensations of war damages and applications for restitution. Part 2 of 4

Subject/Index Terms:
Collaboration in ghettos
Collaboration of Jewish Administration in the Holocaust
Consular support
Issuance of certificates
Jewish courts of honor
Judenraete (Jewish councils)
Polish consulates in Germany, postwar
Polish military representation in Germany, postwar
recovery of property
Reinstatement of passports
Repatriation to Poland, postwar
Wartime restitutions
Unknown author of conference notes taken on a Polish military mission, Berlin, September 1947
Poland (1945--1991)
Polish, language
Narratives in Polish language
Documents in Polish language
Creators:
unknown author of conference notes taken on a Polish military mission, Berlin, September 1947 (September 4 – 6, 1947)
Epstein, Estera
Document/Artifact of Item-Level 3: RG-01.16.02.03, Conference notes taken on a Polish military mission, Berlin, September 1947, Part 3, 4--6 September 1947Add to your cart.View associated digital content.

The Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US zone of occupation in Germany took an initiative to settle the issues of restitutions, compensations, recovery of property on behalf of Polish Jews who temporarily resided in displaced persons caps or elsewhere in Germany. Questions of reinstatement of Polish passports for the former Polish citizens have been also discussed. Issuance of various certificates by Polish authorities for the former Polish citizens resided in Germany or elsewhere was also a subject of discussion.

This document contains 14 pages of handwritten notes, taken during the conference, which took place between the 4th and 6th of September 1947 at the Polish military mission in Berlin.  The following delegates of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US zone in Germany attended the Conference: attorney Estera Epstein, Dr. Aleksander Celniker, and Henryk Goldring.

The Polish government was represented by Lieutenant-Colonel Stanislaw Gebert.  The main themes of the conference reads as follows: restitution claims, a need to prepare the new, appropriate forms for the restoration of full powers of ownership, and applications for opening and closing the processes of succession.  Another important issue discussed was a request to extend a deadline for applications for compensations of war damages and applications for restitutions. Part 3 of 4

Subject/Index Terms:
Wartime restitutions
Repatriation to Poland, postwar
Reinstatement of passports
recovery of property
Polish military representation in Germany, postwar
Polish consulates in Germany, postwar
Judenraete (Jewish councils)
Jewish courts of honor
Issuance of certificates
Consular support
Collaboration of Jewish Administration in the Holocaust
Collaboration in ghettos
Unknown author of conference notes taken on a Polish military mission, Berlin, September 1947
Poland (1945--1991)
Polish, language
Narratives in Polish language
Documents in Polish language
Creators:
unknown author of conference notes taken on a Polish military mission, Berlin, September 1947 (September 4 – 6, 1947)
Epstein, Estera
Document/Artifact of Item-Level 4: RG-01.16.02.04, Conference notes taken on a Polish military mission, Berlin, September 1947, Part 4, 4--6 September 1947Add to your cart.View associated digital content.

The Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US zone of occupation in Germany took an initiative to settle the issues of restitutions, compensations, recovery of property on behalf of Polish Jews who temporarily resided in displaced persons caps or elsewhere in Germany. Questions of reinstatement of Polish passports for the former Polish citizens have been also discussed. Issuance of various certificates by Polish authorities for the former Polish citizens resided in Germany or elsewhere was also a subject of discussion.

This document contains 14 pages of handwritten notes, taken during the conference, which took place between the 4th and 6th of September 1947 at the Polish military mission in Berlin.  The following delegates of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US zone in Germany attended teh Conference: attorney Estera Epstein, Dr. Aleksander Celniker, and Henryk Goldring.

The Polish government was represented by Lieutenant-Colonel Stanislaw Gebert.  The main themes of the conference reads as follows: restitution claims, a need to prepare the new, appropriate forms for the restoration of full powers of ownership, and applications for opening and closing the processes of succession.  Another important issue discussed was a request to extend a deadline for applications for compensations of war damages and applications for restitutions. Part 4 of 4

Subject/Index Terms:
Collaboration in ghettos
Collaboration of Jewish Administration in the Holocaust
Consular support
Issuance of certificates
Jewish courts of honor
Judenraete (Jewish councils)
Polish consulates in Germany, postwar
Polish military representation in Germany, postwar
recovery of property
Reinstatement of passports
Repatriation to Poland, postwar
Wartime restitutions
Unknown author of conference notes taken on a Polish military mission, Berlin, September 1947
Poland (1945--1991)
Polish, language
Narratives in Polish language
Documents in Polish language
Creators:
unknown author of conference notes taken on a Polish military mission, Berlin, September 1947 (September 4 – 6, 1947)
Epstein, Estera
Document/Artifact of Item-Level 3: RG-01.16.03, Letter to the Legal Department of Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Warsaw, October 1947, 1 October 1947Add to your cart.View associated digital content.

This letter is written on behalf of Polish Jews residing in postwar Germany. It has been emphasized the new government of Polish People's Republic demonstrates compassion to the unprecedented tragedy befallen on Jewish people of Poland.

This letter outlines a number of serious issues that prevent normalization with regard to the processes of reinstatement of citizenship, issuance of passports, recovery of property, communication and travelling as well as consular support, all in all it is experienced by Polish Jews in postwar Germany.

Subject/Index Terms:
Polish People Republic
Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Poland
Repatriation to Poland, postwar
Consular support
Reinstatement of passports
Lost property recovery
Issuance of certificates
Polish military representation in Germany, postwar
Legal Department of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in Germany
Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US zone of occupation in Germany, activities
Collaboration in ghettos
Judenraete (Jewish councils)
Jewish courts of honor
Documents in Polish language
Polish, language
Narratives in Polish language
Poland (1945--1991)
Consular support, Polish
Creators:
Legal Department of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US Zone of Occupation in Germany
Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US zone of occupation in Germany (1945 -- 1952)
Epstein, Estera
Folder 4: RG-01.16.04, Handwritten notes about the Jewish Court of Honor, Estera Epstein, 1949, 1945 --1946; 1948 --1949Add to your cart.

These judicial organs faced at least twofold task. A mundane task was to serve justice for Jewish population located within displaced persons camps. A formidable task undertaken by the Jewish Courts of Honor and supported by the US Military Government in Germany was however bringing to justice Jewish collaborators. Jewish collaborators, largely the higher echelon of Jewish Councils' members, heads of departments in the ghettos, lager and block aeltestes, Juedische Ordungsdienst service (Jewish police) in the ghetto often than not collaborated with the German Administration. There were instances of drastic activities that led to enormous enrichment and gaining wealth through the black market activities and partnership with the German supervision authorities, such as Gestapo, Police and other security forces.

Such Jewish individuals who ended up after the war in Germany were enthusiastically put on trial. Regrettably prerogatives and functions of the Jewish courts of honor were limited. The people served in the self-established departments of justice demonstrated exemplary commitment to restore justice and serve justice. Jewish collaborators used any possible means to distort the wartime factness and present themselves in the light of public servants, which they never had been, especially during the Holocaust.

Subject/Index Terms:
Jewish courts of honor
Collaboration of Jewish Administration in the Holocaust
Collaboration with German administration
Jewish collaborators
Jewish collaborators on trials
Investigation of Jewish collaborators
Collaboration in ghettos
collaboration in the Holocaust
Judenraete (Jewish councils)
Germany (1945 -- 1949)
Documents in Yiddish language
Yiddish, language
narratives in Yiddish
Creators:
Legal Department of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US Zone of Occupation in Germany
Epstein, Estera
Document/Artifact of Item-Level 1: RG-01.16.04.01, Handwritten notes about the Jewish Court of Honor, Estera Epstein, 1949, Part 1, 1945 --1946; 1948 --1949Add to your cart.View associated digital content.

These judicial organs faced at least twofold task. A mundane task was to serve justice for Jewish population located within displaced persons camps. A formidable task undertaken by the Jewish Courts of Honor and supported by the US Military Government in Germany was however bringing to justice Jewish collaborators. Jewish collaborators, largely the higher echelon of Jewish Councils' members, heads of departments in the ghettos, lager and block aeltestes, Juedische Ordungsdienst service (Jewish police) in the ghetto often than not collaborated with the German Administration. There were instances of drastic activities that led to enormous enrichment and gaining wealth through the black market activities and partnership with the German supervision authorities, such as Gestapo, Police and other security forces.

Such Jewish individuals who ended up after the war in Germany were enthusiastically put on trial. Regrettably prerogatives and functions of the Jewish courts of honor were limited. The people served in the self-established departments of justice demonstrated exemplary commitment to restore justice and serve justice. Jewish collaborators used any possible means to distort the wartime facts and present themselves in the light of public servants, which they never had been, especially during the Holocaust. Part 1 of 7

Subject/Index Terms:
Collaboration in ghettos
collaboration in the Holocaust
Collaboration of Jewish Administration in the Holocaust
Collaboration with German administration
Investigation of Jewish collaborators
Jewish collaborators
Jewish collaborators on trials
Jewish courts of honor
Judenraete (Jewish councils)
Yiddish, language
Documents in Yiddish language
narratives in Yiddish
Germany (1945 -- 1949)
Creators:
Legal Department of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US Zone of Occupation in Germany
Epstein, Estera
Document/Artifact of Item-Level 2: RG-01.16.04.02, Handwritten notes about the Jewish Court of Honor, Estera Epstein, 1949, Part 2, 1945 --1946; 1948 --1949Add to your cart.View associated digital content.

These judicial organs faced at least twofold task. A mundane task was to serve justice for Jewish population located within displaced persons camps. A formidable task undertaken by the Jewish Courts of Honor and supported by the US Military Government in Germany was however bringing to justice Jewish collaborators. Jewish collaborators, largely the higher echelon of Jewish Councils' members, heads of departments in the ghettos, lager and block aeltestes, Juedische Ordungsdienst service (Jewish police) in the ghetto often than not collaborated with the German Administration. There were instances of drastic activities that led to enormous enrichment and gaining wealth through the black market activities and partnership with the German supervision authorities, such as Gestapo, Police and other security forces.

Such Jewish individuals who ended up after the war in Germany were enthusiastically put on trial. Regrettably prerogatives and functions of the Jewish courts of honor were limited. The people served in the self-established departments of justice demonstrated exemplary commitment to restore justice and serve justice. Jewish collaborators used any possible means to distort the wartime facts and present themselves in the light of public servants, which they never had been, especially during the Holocaust. Part 2 of 7

Subject/Index Terms:
Collaboration in ghettos
collaboration in the Holocaust
Collaboration of Jewish Administration in the Holocaust
Collaboration with German administration
Investigation of Jewish collaborators
Jewish collaborators
Jewish collaborators on trials
Jewish courts of honor
Judenraete (Jewish councils)
Yiddish, language
Documents in Yiddish language
narratives in Yiddish
Germany (1945--1949)
Creators:
Epstein, Estera
Legal Department of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US Zone of Occupation in Germany
Document/Artifact of Item-Level 3: RG-01.16.04.03, Handwritten notes about the Jewish Court of Honor, Estera Epstein, 1949, Part 3, 1945 --1946; 1948 --1949Add to your cart.View associated digital content.

These judicial organs faced at least twofold task. A mundane task was to serve justice for Jewish population located within displaced persons camps. A formidable task undertaken by the Jewish Courts of Honor and supported by the US Military Government in Germany was however bringing to justice Jewish collaborators. Jewish collaborators, largely the higher echelon of Jewish Councils' members, heads of departments in the ghettos, lager and block aeltestes, Juedische Ordungsdienst service (Jewish police) in the ghetto often than not collaborated with the German Administration. There were instances of drastic activities that led to enormous enrichment and gaining wealth through the black market activities and partnership with the German supervision authorities, such as Gestapo, Police and other security forces.

Such Jewish individuals who ended up after the war in Germany were enthusiastically put on trial. Regrettably prerogatives and functions of the Jewish courts of honor were limited. The people served in the self-established departments of justice demonstrated exemplary commitment to restore justice and serve justice. Jewish collaborators used any possible means to distort the wartime facts and present themselves in the light of public servants, which they never had been, especially during the Holocaust. Part 3 of 7

Subject/Index Terms:
Collaboration in ghettos
collaboration in the Holocaust
Collaboration of Jewish Administration in the Holocaust
Collaboration with German administration
Investigation of Jewish collaborators
Jewish collaborators
Jewish collaborators on trials
Jewish courts of honor
Judenraete (Jewish councils)
Yiddish, language
Documents in Yiddish language
narratives in Yiddish
Germany (1945--1949)
Creators:
Epstein, Estera
Legal Department of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US Zone of Occupation in Germany
Document/Artifact of Item-Level 4: RG-01.16.04.04, Handwritten notes about the Jewish Court of Honor, Estera Epstein, 1949, Part 4, 1945 --1946; 1948 --1949Add to your cart.View associated digital content.

These judicial organs faced at least twofold task. A mundane task was to serve justice for Jewish population located within displaced persons camps. A formidable task undertaken by the Jewish Courts of Honor and supported by the US Military Government in Germany was however bringing to justice Jewish collaborators. Jewish collaborators, largely the higher echelon of Jewish Councils' members, heads of departments in the ghettos, lager and block aeltestes, Juedische Ordungsdienst service (Jewish police) in the ghetto often than not collaborated with the German Administration. There were instances of drastic activities that led to enormous enrichment and gaining wealth through the black market activities and partnership with the German supervision authorities, such as Gestapo, Police and other security forces

Such Jewish individuals who ended up after the war in Germany were enthusiastically put on trial. Regrettably prerogatives and functions of the Jewish courts of honor were limited. The people served in the self-established departments of justice demonstrated exemplary commitment to restore justice and serve justice. Jewish collaborators used any possible means to distort the wartime facts and present themselves in the light of public servants, which they never had been, especially during the Holocaust. Part 4 of 7

Subject/Index Terms:
Germany (1945--1949)
narratives in Yiddish
Documents in Yiddish language
Yiddish, language
Judenraete (Jewish councils)
Jewish courts of honor
Jewish collaborators on trials
Jewish collaborators
Investigation of Jewish collaborators
Collaboration with German administration
Collaboration of Jewish Administration in the Holocaust
collaboration in the Holocaust
Collaboration in ghettos
Creators:
Epstein, Estera
Legal Department of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US Zone of Occupation in Germany
Document/Artifact of Item-Level 5: RG-01.16.04.05, Handwritten notes about the Jewish Court of Honor, Estera Epstein, 1949, Part 5, 1945 --1946; 1948 --1949Add to your cart.View associated digital content.

These judicial organs faced at least twofold task. A mundane task was to serve justice for Jewish population located within displaced persons camps. A formidable task undertaken by the Jewish Courts of Honor and supported by the US Military Government in Germany was however bringing to justice Jewish collaborators. Jewish collaborators, largely the higher echelon of Jewish Councils' members, heads of departments in the ghettos, lager and block aeltestes, Juedische Ordungsdienst service (Jewish police) in the ghetto often than not collaborated with the German Administration. There were instances of drastic activities that led to enormous enrichment and gaining wealth through the black market activities and partnership with the German supervision authorities, such as Gestapo, Police and other security forces.

Such Jewish individuals who ended up after the war in Germany were enthusiastically put on trial. Regrettably prerogatives and functions of the Jewish courts of honor were limited. The people served in the self-established departments of justice demonstrated exemplary commitment to restore justice and serve justice. Jewish collaborators used any possible means to distort the wartime factness and present themselves in the light of public servants, which they never had been, especially during the Holocaust. Part 5 of 7

Subject/Index Terms:
Collaboration in ghettos
collaboration in the Holocaust
Collaboration of Jewish Administration in the Holocaust
Collaboration with German administration
Investigation of Jewish collaborators
Jewish collaborators
Jewish collaborators on trials
Jewish courts of honor
Judenraete (Jewish councils)
Yiddish, language
Documents in Yiddish language
narratives in Yiddish
Germany (1945 -- 1949)
Creators:
Epstein, Estera
Legal Department of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US Zone of Occupation in Germany
Document/Artifact of Item-Level 6: RG-01.16.04.06, Handwritten notes about the Jewish Court of Honor, Estera Epstein, 1949, Part 6, 1945 --1946; 1948 --1949Add to your cart.View associated digital content.

These judicial organs faced at least twofold task. A mundane task was to serve justice for Jewish population located within displaced persons camps. A formidable task undertaken by the Jewish Courts of Honor and supported by the US Military Government in Germany was however bringing to justice Jewish collaborators. Jewish collaborators, largely the higher echelon of Jewish Councils' members, heads of departments in the ghettos, lager and block aeltestes, Juedische Ordungsdienst service (Jewish police) in the ghetto often than not collaborated with the German Administration. There were instances of drastic activities that led to enormous enrichment and gaining wealth through the black market activities and partnership with the German supervision authorities, such as Gestapo, Police and other security forces.

Such Jewish individuals who ended up after the war in Germany were enthusiastically put on trial. Regrettably prerogatives and functions of the Jewish courts of honor were limited. The people served in the self-established departments of justice demonstrated exemplary commitment to restore justice and serve justice. Jewish collaborators used any possible means to distort the wartime facts and present themselves in the light of public servants, which they never had been, especially during the Holocaust. Part 6 of 7

Subject/Index Terms:
Collaboration in ghettos
Collaboration in the Holocaust in Belarus, 1941 -- 1944
Collaboration of Jewish Administration in the Holocaust
Collaboration with German administration
Investigation of Jewish collaborators
Jewish collaborators
Jewish collaborators on trials
Jewish courts of honor
Judenraete (Jewish councils)
Yiddish, language
Documents in Yiddish language
narratives in Yiddish
Germany (1945 -- 1949)
Creators:
Epstein, Estera
Legal Department of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US Zone of Occupation in Germany
Document/Artifact of Item-Level 7: RG-01.16.04.07, Handwritten notes about the Jewish Court of Honor, Estera Epstein, 1949, Part 7, 1945 --1946; 1948 --1949Add to your cart.View associated digital content.

These judicial organs faced at least twofold task. A mundane task was to serve justice for Jewish population located within displaced persons camps. A formidable task undertaken by the Jewish Courts of Honor and supported by the US Military Government in Germany was however bringing to justice Jewish collaborators. Jewish collaborators, largely the higher echelon of Jewish Councils' members, heads of departments in the ghettos, lager and block aeltestes, Juedische Ordungsdienst service (Jewish police) in the ghetto often than not collaborated with the German Administration. There were instances of drastic activities that led to enormous enrichment and gaining wealth through the black market activities and partnership with the German supervision authorities, such as Gestapo, Police and other security forces.

Such Jewish individuals who ended up after the war in Germany were enthusiastically put on trial. Regrettably prerogatives and functions of the Jewish courts of honor were limited. The people served in the self-established departments of justice demonstrated exemplary commitment to restore justice and serve justice. Jewish collaborators used any possible means to distort the wartime facts and present themselves in the light of public servants, which they never had been, especially during the Holocaust. Part 7 of 7

Subject/Index Terms:
Collaboration in ghettos
collaboration in the Holocaust
Collaboration of Jewish Administration in the Holocaust
Collaboration with German administration
Investigation of Jewish collaborators
Jewish collaborators
Jewish collaborators on trials
Jewish courts of honor
Judenraete (Jewish councils)
Yiddish, language
Documents in Yiddish language
narratives in Yiddish
Germany (1945 -- 1949)
Creators:
Epstein, Estera
Legal Department of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US Zone of Occupation in Germany
Document/Artifact of Item-Level 5: RG-01.16.05, Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US zone of occupation in Germany, Agenda in Polish, ca 1948Add to your cart.View associated digital content.

One typed page on the letterhead of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US zone of occupation in Germany; with headquarters in Munich.  This memorandum specifies four major themes on which the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US zone of occupation in Germany concentrates its efforts.  These four subjects were:

1. Compensations of war damages.  It was requested to extend a deadline for registration.

2. Text of the new legislation for succession.

3. The list of lawyers in Poland.

4. Improving the service rendering to all petitioners by the Polish consular posts.

Subject/Index Terms:
Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US zone of occupation in Germany, activities
Federation of Jews from Poland in the US zone of occupation in Germany
Repatriation to Poland, postwar
Consular support
Consular support, Polish
Jewish courts of honor
Judenraete (Jewish councils)
Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US Occupation Zone of Germany
Munich (Germany)
Germany (1945--1949)
Polish, language
English, language
Documents in English language
Narratives in Polish language
Narratives in English language
German, language
Creators:
Federation of Jews from Poland in the US occupation zone in Germany (ca 1948)
Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US zone of occupation in Germany (1945 -- 1952)
Epstein, Estera
Document/Artifact of Item-Level 6: RG-01.16.06, Notice from the Legal Dept. of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the U.S. zone of occupation, November 1946Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
The Legal Department of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the American zone of occupation in Germany states that it has received a positive decision from the Americans. It supports the related pursuits undertaken by the Jewish judiciary and Jewish Court over the DP camps in the U.S. zone of occupation in Germany.
Subject/Index Terms:
Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US Occupation Zone of Germany
Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US zone of occupation in Germany, activities
Relations between the Central Committee of Liberated Jews and US Military Government  in Germany
Legal Department of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in Germany
Judenraete (Jewish councils)
Jewish courts of honor
Documents in Yiddish language
Documents in English language
narratives in Yiddish
Yiddish, language
English, language
Munich (Germany)
Germany (1945 -- 1949)
Creators:
Legal Department of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US Zone of Occupation in Germany
Epstein, Estera
Document/Artifact of Item-Level 7: RG-01.16.07, Business trip arrangements and permissions issued by the American military authorities, 2 September 1947Add to your cart.View associated digital content.

Business trip arrangements and permissions issued by the American military authorities to Henryk Goldring, Legal Department of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the U.S. zone of occupation in Germany; Dr. Alexander Celnikier, Legal Department of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the U.S. zone of occupation in Germany; Dr. Esther Epstein, Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the U.S. zone of occupation in Germany. The aforementioned officials are allowed to travel on business from Munich to Berlin.

On the 2nd of September 1947, the Headquarters of 7822 Station Complement unit (U.S. Military Government in Germany) issued a Travel Document for aforementioned persons travelling on business from Munich to Berlin on the 2nd and 9th of September 1947. The purpose of this trip was to confer with the officials of the Polish Military Mission in Berlin. They were authorized to commute in both directions.

The travel arrangements have been authorized by Colonel George R. Scithers, Liaison Officer of the EUCOM Liaison Office. The cost of transportation was charged to the respective funds of American Administration.

Subject/Index Terms:
U.S. Military Government
U.S. zone of occupation--Germany
Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US Occupation Zone of Germany
Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US zone of occupation in Germany, activities
Legal Department of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in Germany
Epstein, Estera
Goldring, Henryk
Celniker, Dr. Aleksander
Munich (Germany)
Berlin (Germany)
Creators:
United States Military Government in Germany
Epstein, Estera
Document/Artifact of Item-Level 8: RG-01.16.08, Memorandum issued by the Legal Department of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in U.S. zone of occupation in GermanyAdd to your cart.View associated digital content.
A memorandum issued by the Legal Department of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in U.S. zone of occupation in Germany.  This memorandum, issued by the Legal Department, inquired about the legal status of the local Jewish courts and also about their judicial activities.  There was also a structural determination on the status and role of the central and local courts designed by the Central Jewish Court in Munich.  The document is written in German.
Subject/Index Terms:
Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US Occupation Zone of Germany
Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US zone of occupation in Germany, activities
Jewish courts of honor--Munich (Germany)
U.S. zone of occupation--Germany
Judenraete (Jewish councils)
German, language
Documents in German language
Narratives in German language
Germany (1945 -- 1949)
Creators:
Legal Department of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US Zone of Occupation in Germany
Epstein, Estera
Folder 9: RG-01.16.09, Handwritten notes by attorney, Estera Epstein, ca 1946Add to your cart.
The document contains handwritten notes by attorney Estera Epstein. The document is 43 pages long.
Subject/Index Terms:
Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US Occupation Zone of Germany
Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US zone of occupation in Germany, activities
Jewish courts of honor--Munich (Germany)
Court of honor of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US Occupation Zone of Germany
Jewish courts of honor
Epstein, Estera
Evidences of Nazi-German crimes against humanity, peace and warcirmes
Prisoner collaboration in Nazi-German concentration camps
Attitudes toward Nazi collaboration and/or collaborators
Jewish collaborators on trials
Investigation of Jewish collaborators
Collaboration in ghettos
collaboration in the Holocaust
Collaboration of Jewish Administration in the Holocaust
Collaboration with German administration
Judenraete (Jewish councils)
Yiddish, language
Documents in Yiddish language
Germany (1945--1949)
Creators:
Epstein, Estera
Przeworski-Pratt, Anna
Legal Department of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US Zone of Occupation in Germany
Document/Artifact of Item-Level 1: RG-01.16.09.01, Handwritten notes by attorney, Estera Epstein, Part 1, ca 1949Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
<p style="margin-left:-13.5pt;"> The document contains handwritten notes by attorney Estera Epstein in Yiddish with Latin script. The document is 43 pages long. Part 1 of 11
Subject/Index Terms:
Attitudes toward Nazi collaboration and/or collaborators
Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US Occupation Zone of Germany
Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US zone of occupation in Germany, activities
Collaboration in ghettos
collaboration in the Holocaust
Collaboration of Jewish Administration in the Holocaust
Collaboration with German administration
Court of honor of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US Occupation Zone of Germany
Epstein, Estera
Evidences of Nazi-German crimes against humanity, peace and warcirmes
Investigation of Jewish collaborators
Jewish collaborators on trials
Jewish courts of honor
Jewish courts of honor--Munich (Germany)
Judenraete (Jewish councils)
Prisoner collaboration in Nazi-German concentration camps
Yiddish, language
Documents in Yiddish language
narratives in Yiddish
Germany (1945 -- 1949)
Creators:
Legal Department of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US Zone of Occupation in Germany
Przeworski-Pratt, Anna
Epstein, Estera
Document/Artifact of Item-Level 2: RG-01.16.09.02, Handwritten notes by attorney, Estera Epstein, Part 2, ca 1946Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
<p style="margin-left:-13.5pt;"> The document contains handwritten notes by attorney Estera Epstein in Yiddish with Latin script. The document is 43 pages long. Part 2 of 11
Subject/Index Terms:
Attitudes toward Nazi collaboration and/or collaborators
Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US Occupation Zone of Germany
Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US zone of occupation in Germany, activities
Collaboration in ghettos
collaboration in the Holocaust
Collaboration of Jewish Administration in the Holocaust
Collaboration with German administration
Court of honor of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US Occupation Zone of Germany
Epstein, Estera
Evidences of Nazi-German crimes against humanity, peace and warcirmes
Investigation of Jewish collaborators
Jewish collaborators on trials
Jewish courts of honor
Jewish courts of honor--Munich (Germany)
Judenraete (Jewish councils)
Prisoner collaboration in Nazi-German concentration camps
Yiddish, language
Documents in Yiddish language
narratives in Yiddish
Creators:
Epstein, Estera
Legal Department of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US Zone of Occupation in Germany
Przeworski-Pratt, Anna
Document/Artifact of Item-Level 3: RG-01.16.09.03, Handwritten notes by attorney, Estera Epstein, Part 3, ca 1946Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
<p style="margin-left:-13.5pt;"> The document contains handwritten notes by attorney Estera Epstein in Yiddish with Latin script. The document is 43 pages long. Part 3 of 11
Subject/Index Terms:
Attitudes toward Nazi collaboration and/or collaborators
Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US Occupation Zone of Germany
Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US zone of occupation in Germany, activities
Collaboration in ghettos
collaboration in the Holocaust
Collaboration of Jewish Administration in the Holocaust
Collaboration with German administration
Court of honor of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US Occupation Zone of Germany
Epstein, Estera
Evidences of Nazi-German crimes against humanity, peace and warcirmes
Investigation of Jewish collaborators
Jewish collaborators on trials
Jewish courts of honor
Jewish courts of honor--Munich (Germany)
Judenraete (Jewish councils)
Prisoner collaboration in Nazi-German concentration camps
Yiddish, language
Documents in Yiddish language
narratives in Yiddish
Germany (1945 -- 1949)
Creators:
Epstein, Estera
Legal Department of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US Zone of Occupation in Germany
Przeworski-Pratt, Anna
Document/Artifact of Item-Level 4: RG-01.16.09.04, Handwritten notes by attorney, Estera Epstein, Part 4, ca 1946Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
<p style="margin-left:-13.5pt;"> The document contains handwritten notes by attorney Estera Epstein in Yiddish with Latin script. The document is 43 pages long. Part 4 of 11
Subject/Index Terms:
Attitudes toward Nazi collaboration and/or collaborators
Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US Occupation Zone of Germany
Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US zone of occupation in Germany, activities
Collaboration in ghettos
collaboration in the Holocaust
Collaboration of Jewish Administration in the Holocaust
Collaboration with German administration
Court of honor of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US Occupation Zone of Germany
Epstein, Estera
Evidences of Nazi-German crimes against humanity, peace and warcirmes
Investigation of Jewish collaborators
Jewish collaborators on trials
Jewish courts of honor
Jewish courts of honor--Munich (Germany)
Judenraete (Jewish councils)
Prisoner collaboration in Nazi-German concentration camps
Yiddish, language
Documents in Yiddish language
Creators:
Epstein, Estera
Legal Department of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US Zone of Occupation in Germany
Przeworski-Pratt, Anna
Document/Artifact of Item-Level 5: RG-01.16.09.05, Handwritten notes by attorney, Estera Epstein, Part 5, ca 1946Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
The document contains handwritten notes by attorney Estera Epstein in Yiddish with Latin script. The document is 43 pages long. Part 5 of 11
Subject/Index Terms:
Attitudes toward Nazi collaboration and/or collaborators
Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US Occupation Zone of Germany
Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US zone of occupation in Germany, activities
Collaboration in ghettos
collaboration in the Holocaust
Collaboration of Jewish Administration in the Holocaust
Collaboration with German administration
Court of honor of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US Occupation Zone of Germany
Epstein, Estera
Evidences of Nazi-German crimes against humanity, peace and warcirmes
Investigation of Jewish collaborators
Jewish collaborators on trials
Jewish courts of honor
Jewish courts of honor--Munich (Germany)
Judenraete (Jewish councils)
Prisoner collaboration in Nazi-German concentration camps
Yiddish, language
Documents in Yiddish language
narratives in Yiddish
Germany (1945 -- 1949)
Creators:
Legal Department of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US Zone of Occupation in Germany
Epstein, Estera
Przeworski-Pratt, Anna
Document/Artifact of Item-Level 6: RG-01.16.09.06, Handwritten notes by attorney, Estera Epstein, Part 6, ca 1946Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
The document contains handwritten notes by attorney Estera Epstein in Yiddish with Latin script. The document is 43 pages long. Part 6 of 11
Subject/Index Terms:
Attitudes toward Nazi collaboration and/or collaborators
Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US zone of occupation in Germany, activities
Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US Occupation Zone of Germany
Collaboration in ghettos
collaboration in the Holocaust
Collaboration of Jewish Administration in the Holocaust
Collaboration with German administration
Court of honor of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US Occupation Zone of Germany
Epstein, Estera
Evidences of Nazi-German crimes against humanity, peace and warcirmes
Investigation of Jewish collaborators
Jewish collaborators on trials
Jewish courts of honor
Jewish courts of honor--Munich (Germany)
Judenraete (Jewish councils)
Prisoner collaboration in Nazi-German concentration camps
Yiddish, language
Documents in Yiddish language
narratives in Yiddish
Germany (1945 -- 1949)
Creators:
Epstein, Estera
Legal Department of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US Zone of Occupation in Germany
Przeworski-Pratt, Anna
Document/Artifact of Item-Level 7: RG-01.16.09.07, Handwritten notes by attorney, Estera Epstein, Part 7, ca 1946Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
The document contains handwritten notes by attorney Estera Epstein in Yiddish with Latin script. The document is 43 pages long. part 7 of 11
Subject/Index Terms:
Attitudes toward Nazi collaboration and/or collaborators
Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US Occupation Zone of Germany
Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US zone of occupation in Germany, activities
Collaboration in ghettos
collaboration in the Holocaust
Collaboration of Jewish Administration in the Holocaust
Collaboration with German administration
Court of honor of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US Occupation Zone of Germany
Epstein, Estera
Evidences of Nazi-German crimes against humanity, peace and warcirmes
Investigation of Jewish collaborators
Jewish collaborators on trials
Jewish courts of honor
Jewish courts of honor--Munich (Germany)
Judenraete (Jewish councils)
Prisoner collaboration in Nazi-German concentration camps
Yiddish, language
Documents in Yiddish language
narratives in Yiddish
Germany (1945 -- 1949)
Creators:
Epstein, Estera
Legal Department of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US Zone of Occupation in Germany
Przeworski-Pratt, Anna
Document/Artifact of Item-Level 8: RG-01.16.09.08, Handwritten notes by attorney, Estera Epstein, Part 8, ca 1946Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
The document contains handwritten notes by attorney Estera Epstein in Yiddish with Latin script. The document is 43 pages long. Part 8 of 11
Subject/Index Terms:
Attitudes toward Nazi collaboration and/or collaborators
Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US Occupation Zone of Germany
Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US zone of occupation in Germany, activities
Collaboration in ghettos
collaboration in the Holocaust
Collaboration of Jewish Administration in the Holocaust
Collaboration with German administration
Court of honor of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US Occupation Zone of Germany
Epstein, Estera
Evidences of Nazi-German crimes against humanity, peace and warcirmes
Investigation of Jewish collaborators
Jewish collaborators on trials
Jewish courts of honor
Jewish courts of honor--Munich (Germany)
Judenraete (Jewish councils)
Prisoner collaboration in Nazi-German concentration camps
Yiddish, language
Documents in Yiddish language
narratives in Yiddish
Germany (1945--1949)
Creators:
Epstein, Estera
Legal Department of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US Zone of Occupation in Germany
Przeworski-Pratt, Anna
Document/Artifact of Item-Level 9: RG-01.16.09.09, Handwritten notes by attorney, Estera Epstein, Part 9, ca 1946Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
The document contains handwritten notes by attorney Estera Epstein in Yiddish with Latin script. The document is 43 pages long. Part 9 of 11
Subject/Index Terms:
Attitudes toward Nazi collaboration and/or collaborators
Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US Occupation Zone of Germany
Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US zone of occupation in Germany, activities
Collaboration in ghettos
collaboration in the Holocaust
Collaboration of Jewish Administration in the Holocaust
Collaboration with German administration
Court of honor of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US Occupation Zone of Germany
Epstein, Estera
Evidences of Nazi-German crimes against humanity, peace and warcirmes
Investigation of Jewish collaborators
Jewish collaborators on trials
Jewish courts of honor
Jewish courts of honor--Munich (Germany)
Judenraete (Jewish councils)
Prisoner collaboration in Nazi-German concentration camps
Yiddish, language
Documents in Yiddish language
narratives in Yiddish
Germany (1945 -- 1949)
Creators:
Epstein, Estera
Legal Department of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US Zone of Occupation in Germany
Przeworski-Pratt, Anna
Document/Artifact of Item-Level 10: RG-01.16.09.10, Handwritten notes by attorney, Estera Epstein, Part 10, ca 1946Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
The document contains handwritten notes by attorney Estera Epstein in Yiddish with Latin script. The document is 43 pages long. Part 10 of 11
Subject/Index Terms:
Attitudes toward Nazi collaboration and/or collaborators
Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US Occupation Zone of Germany
Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US zone of occupation in Germany, activities
Collaboration in ghettos
collaboration in the Holocaust
Collaboration of Jewish Administration in the Holocaust
Collaboration with German administration
Court of honor of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US Occupation Zone of Germany
Epstein, Estera
Evidences of Nazi-German crimes against humanity, peace and warcirmes
Investigation of Jewish collaborators
Jewish collaborators on trials
Jewish courts of honor
Jewish courts of honor--Munich (Germany)
Judenraete (Jewish councils)
Prisoner collaboration in Nazi-German concentration camps
Yiddish, language
Documents in Yiddish language
narratives in Yiddish
Germany (1945--1949)
Creators:
Epstein, Estera
Legal Department of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US Zone of Occupation in Germany
Przeworski-Pratt, Anna
Document/Artifact of Item-Level 11: RG-01.16.09.11, Handwritten notes by attorney, Estera Epstein, Part 11, ca 1946Add to your cart.View associated digital content.
The document contains handwritten notes by attorney Estera Epstein in Yiddish with Latin script. The document is 43 pages long. Part 11 of 11
Subject/Index Terms:
Attitudes toward Nazi collaboration and/or collaborators
Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US Occupation Zone of Germany
Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US zone of occupation in Germany, activities
Collaboration in ghettos
collaboration in the Holocaust
Collaboration of Jewish Administration in the Holocaust
Collaboration with German administration
Court of honor of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US Occupation Zone of Germany
Epstein, Estera
Evidences of Nazi-German crimes against humanity, peace and warcirmes
Investigation of Jewish collaborators
Jewish collaborators on trials
Jewish courts of honor
Jewish courts of honor--Munich (Germany)
Judenraete (Jewish councils)
Prisoner collaboration in Nazi-German concentration camps
Yiddish, language
Documents in Yiddish language
narratives in Yiddish
Germany (1945 -- 1949)
Creators:
Epstein, Estera
Legal Department of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US Zone of Occupation in Germany
Przeworski-Pratt, Anna
Folder 10: RG-01.16.10, Handwritten List of 72 names, ca 1948Add to your cart.

The document contains a handwritten list of names of the individuals whose wartime and post-wartime activities were investigated by the Legal Department of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the U.S. zone of occupation in Germany. They were charged with various crimes ranging from illegal actions in DP camps to more serious accusations of collaboration with the German-Nazi administrations in the occupied territories.

This list does not refer to a specific DP camp in the American zone of occupation in Germany where the people in question resided. Gleaned from the other documents, especially considering the testimony of Anna Przeworski-Pratt (Testimony of Anna Przeworski (Estera Epstein) in Polish in the form of a letter to a former Polish colleague, RG-01.01, pages: 13 - 16) most likely the list was from a DP camp in Landsberg.

There is a short note in reference to the given names. The note speaks specifically to their crimes, charges, time served in prison and so on. The cases varied from wartime collaborations with the German adminstration in the ghettos and concentration camps, to pretty crimes like stealing food or clothing in a particular DP camp.

The document is in Yiddish (in Latin script), Polish

Subject/Index Terms:
Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US Occupation Zone of Germany
Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US zone of occupation in Germany, activities
Legal Department of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in Germany
Court of honor of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US Occupation Zone of Germany
Jewish courts of honor--Munich (Germany)
Jewish courts of honor
Evidences of Nazi-German crimes against humanity, peace and warcirmes
Attitudes toward Nazi collaboration and/or collaborators
Collaboration with German administration
Investigation of Jewish collaborators
Jewish collaborators
Prisoner collaboration in Nazi-German concentration camps
Jewish collaborators on trials
War crimes trials--Post-WWII
Collaboration in ghettos
collaboration in the Holocaust
Collaboration of Jewish Administration in the Holocaust
Judenraete (Jewish councils)
Creators:
Epstein, Estera
Przeworski-Pratt, Anna
Legal Department of the Central Committee of Liberated Jews in the US Zone of Occupation in Germany
Document/Artifact of Item-Level 1: RG-01.16.10.01, Handwritten List of 72 names, Part 1Add to your cart.
Document/Artifact of Item-Level 2: RG-01.16.10.02, Handwritten List of 72 names, Part 2Add to your cart.
Document/Artifact of Item-Level 3: RG-01.16.10.03, Handwritten List of 72 names, Part 3Add to your cart.
Document/Artifact of Item-Level 4: RG-01.16.10.04, Handwritten List of 72 names, Part 4Add to your cart.

Browse by Sub-Collection:

[Sub-Collection RG-01.04: Anna Przeworska-Pratt papers, 1939 -1973],
[Sub-Collection RG-01.05: Siegfried Halbreich papers, 1939 -- 1970s],
[Sub-Collection RG-01.06: Barry Ziff papers, 1944-1945],
[Sub-Collection RG-01.08: Anna Lipszyc papers, 1939 -- 1946],
[Folder 6: RG-01.01, Irena Lusky Collection, 1976 -- 1977],
[Folder 7: RG-01.07, Erica Leon Testimony],
[Folder 8: RG-01.10, Marta Mitdank testimony, 15 October 1946],
[Folder 9: RG-01.12,  Ludwik Hirshfeld memoir, 1946],
[Folder 10: RG-01.15, Alice Schragai memoir, 21 January 1982],
[Sub-Collection 11: RG-01.16, Central Committee of Liberated Jews in U.S. Zone of Occupation in Germany papers, 1946-1949],
[Collection of Folder-Level 12: RG-01.17, Otto Herskovic memoir, 1946],
[Sub-Collection RG-01.18: John van Huzun wartime diary the Netherlands, 1944-1945],
[Sub-Collection RG-01.03: Collection of Dachau diaries and letters, 1933-1945],
[Sub-Collection RG-01.09: Betti Gerard papers, 1936-1949],
[Sub-Collection RG-01.11: Dawid Gertler papers, 1948-1949],
[Sub-Collection RG-01.13: Josef Broide papers, 1979],
[Sub-Collection RG-01.14: Henryk Gliksman papers, 1948-1949],
[Sub-Collection RG-01.02: Nika Fleissig papers, ca. 1920-1989],
[All]


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